LibraryRead Our Articles on Various Hearing Topics

  • What is an Audiologist? +

    What is an Audiologist? Audiologists are health-care professionals who evaluate, diagnose, treat, and manage hearing loss, as well as other conditions like tinnitus and balance disorders. An audiologist is a person who holds a minimum of a Master's degree in Audiology; professionals seeking education in Audiology who do not currently hold Read More
  • A Discussion of Acoustic Neuroma +

    A Discussion of Acoustic Neuroma GENERAL COMMENTS Acoustic tumors are fibrous growths originating from the auditory or balance nerves and are usually not malignant. They do not spread to other parts of the brain, other than by direct extension. They constitute approximately 10% of all brain tumors. They are located between Read More
  • A Discussion of Chronic Ear Infections +

    A Discussion of Chronic Ear Infections CHRONIC EAR INFECTION Chronic ear infection is the result of an ear infection that has left a residual injury to the ear. This type of infection has been established as the cause of your ear problem. Chronic ear infection (the technical diagnosis is chronic Read More
  • What is an Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)? +

    What is an Auditory Processing Disorder (APD)? Auditory Processing (also called Central Auditory Processing) refers to the means by which we make sense of what we hear.  Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) refers to the abnormal interaction of hearing, neural transmission and the brain’s ability to make sense of sound. People Read More
  • Cause of Tinnitus +

    Cause of Tinnitus Tinnitus is the term for the perception of sound when no external sound is present. It is often referred to as "ringing in the ears," although some people hear hissing, roaring, whistling, chirping, or clicking. Tinnitus is not a disease but a symptom of another underlying condition Read More
  • A Discussion of Dizziness +

    A Discussion of Dizziness Dizziness is a symptom, not a disease. It may be defined as a sensation of unsteadiness, imbalance, or disorientation in relation to an individual’s surroundings. The symptom of dizziness may vary widely from person to person and be caused by many difference diseases. Dizziness may or Read More
  • A Discussion of Eustachian Tube and Middle Ear Problems +

    A Discussion of Eustachian Tube and Middle Ear Problems First, in order to understand possible problems of the middle ear and eustachian tube, a brief review of ear anatomy & physiology is in order. MECHANISM OF HEARING The ear is comprised of three portions: an outer ear (external), a middle ear and Read More
  • A Discussion of Hearing Problems in Children +

    A Discussion of Hearing Problems in Children Five thousand children are born profoundly deaf each year in the United States alone. Another 10 to 15 percent of newborns have a partial hearing loss. SENSORINEURAL IMPAIRMENT A sensorineural hearing loss is used to describe hearing impairments which result from a disruption of the conversion of Read More
  • Medical Science Shows Insight into Noisy Eyeballs and Tinnitus +

    Medical Science Shows Insight into Noisy Eyeballs and Tinnitus Recently an article was published in Scientific American on noisy eyeballs. Yes you read correctly, noisy eyeballs. Often times happy accidents happen in medicine or shall you serendipity in science. You see R. Douglas Fields, developed noisy eyeballs. Each time he moved his Read More
  • What is Tinnitus? +

    What is Tinnitus? Tinnitus is an abnormal perception of a sound reported by a patient. This "head noise" is unrelated to an external source of stimulation. Tinnitus is a common disorder affecting over 50 million people in the United States. It may be intermittent, constant, or fluctuant, mild or severe, Read More
  • Candidates for ALDs +

    Candidates for ALDs Are ALDs Only for People Using Hearing Aids? No. People with all degrees and types of hearing loss — even people with normal hearing can benefit from assistive listening devices. Some assistive listening devices are used with hearing aids; some are used without hearing aids. Read More
  • How do I know if I have Hearing Loss? +

    How do I know if I have Hearing Loss? Hearing loss can be due to the aging process, exposure to loud noise, certain medications, infections, head or ear trauma, congenital (at birth) or genetic factors, diseases, as well as a number of other causes. Recent data suggests there are over 34 Read More
  • Types of Hearing Aids +

    Types of Hearing Aids There are many types of hearing aids today, and the style or device is dependent upon the user's individual needs. There are in-the-ear styles as well as behind-the-ear styles. Also, hearing aid technology has advanced, with many new and improved options to choose from. Styles of Read More
  • Type and Degree of Hearing Loss +

    Type and Degree of Hearing Loss Degree of Hearing Loss Results of the audiometric evaluation are plotted on a chart called an audiogram. Loudness is plotted from top to bottom; top of the graph is very quiet and bottom of the graph is very loud. Frequency, or pitch, from low Read More
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